Grab a cuppa and prepare to be outraged at the widespread inequality faced by schoolgirls.

Dr Amanda Mergler, co-founder of Girls’ Uniform Agenda, outlines why she and Simone Cariss have joined forces to seek school uniform equality for girls. Despite the laws around uniform equality, many schools still insist on girls wearing skirts and dresses, year round.

grab a coffee and read about school uniform

Special thanks to Dr Mergler for her insightful and thoughtful answers to my questions.

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Panty Liners.

You know, those things we are apparently supposed to wear between periods? When I was 19, I worked in a pharmacy. I have a vivid memory of a company rep coming to talk to my boss about putting in a panty liner display. I was standing next to her when he explained that the concept behind panty liner marketing was to make women feel that they needed to wear one everyday, thus creating a constant circle of profit.

A man literally stood there and told two women that his company’s genius lay in convincing women that they needed to buy a product that they didn’t actually need. The idea, he said, was to make women feel that liners would keep them “clean”. That’s why, he explained, the packaging uses words like “fresh”.

2 women pretend to vomit at the idea that panty liners are a necessity Needless to say, my boss chose not to stock that particular product. Despite that, panty liners made their way into the market and loads of women buy into the idea that they need them or use them out of preference.

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Today, I have a special guest post from Dr Amanda Mergler, co-founder of Girls Uniform Agenda. Girls Uniform Agenda campaigns for young girls to have the right to a choice of uniform, including pants, like boys have. This is something I’ve written about in the past and it’s interesting to see what the legislation says versus what is actually in practice.

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Having older kids, the conversation recently turned to them getting jobs. My worry is that school work might suffer, which is important. Probably less important is how old it will make me feel if the kids are old enough to get jobs! I do think it’s good for kids to work, though. Especially outside the home, though chores are also beneficial. Teenage employment teach responsibility and give kids the satisfaction of their own money. It also doesn’t hurt to pick up some skills and experience to help them when they enter the adult workforce. What all this has made me think about is the variety of jobs I had as a teenager.

The first few were a little bit unusual, now that I think back.

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